FAQs

All love surrogacy answers your most pressing questions

Frequently Asked Questions:

Intended Parents

1. Intended Parents (IPs) will complete a profile detailing their preferences, expectations, and desired characteristics in a surrogate.

2. All Love, as your surrogacy agency, will conduct extensive screenings on potential surrogates. This process typically includes psychological evaluations, background checks, interviews, and reviewing the surrogate’s previous pregnancy history.

3. Based on the IP’s preferences and the surrogate’s profile, the agency will attempt to match you with a suitable surrogate. Factors such as geographic location, medical history, personal values, and compatibility play a role in the matching process.

4. Once a potential match is identified, you will have the opportunity to communicate with the surrogate, through an agency-mediated process, such as a Zoom call or in-person meeting if logistically possible. This allows both parties to get to know each other, discuss expectations, and ask questions.

5. Once the meeting has commenced both parties are usually given some time to make their decision. Once a mutual match is established then the process can move forward.

The matching process requires careful consideration and open communication to ensure a positive and successful surrogacy journey. Working with experienced professionals can help guide you through each step and provide the necessary support along the way.

Surrogacy legal agreements often include clauses that clearly state the intentions and desires of the intended parents and the surrogate. These agreements establish that the intended parents will be the legal parents of the child and that the surrogate does not have any parental rights or obligations. In some jurisdictions, the intended parents may obtain a pre-birth order or court order that establishes their legal parentage before the child is born. This helps ensure a smooth transition of parental rights and responsibilities.

While rare, disputes over parental rights can occur in surrogacy arrangements. If the surrogate expresses a desire to keep the baby against the terms of the agreement, the legal provisions and documentation in place will serve as the foundation for resolving the situation. The specific actions taken will depend on the applicable laws and the provisions outlined in the surrogacy agreement.

The main difference between gestational surrogacy and traditional surrogacy lies in the genetic relationship between the surrogate and the child.

Gestational Surrogacy: In gestational surrogacy, the surrogate, also known as the gestational carrier, is not genetically related to the child she carries. In this process, an embryo created using the intended parents’ or donors’ gametes (sperm and egg) is transferred to the gestational carrier’s uterus. The gestational carrier’s role is to carry and nurture the pregnancy until birth. Once the child is born, the intended parents become the legal and genetic parents of the child.

Traditional Surrogacy: In traditional surrogacy, the surrogate is genetically related to the child. In this arrangement, the surrogate uses her own eggs to conceive the child through artificial insemination with the intended father’s sperm or donor sperm. As a result, the surrogate is both the gestational and genetic mother of the child. In traditional surrogacy, legal and ethical complexities can arise because of the genetic relationship between the surrogate and the child. All Love Surrogacy does not do traditional surrogacy arrangements.

It’s important to note that gestational surrogacy is more common and widely practiced today due to the clear distinction between the genetic and gestational roles. It offers a greater level of legal clarity and fewer potential complications compared to traditional surrogacy.

The gestational surrogacy process can vary in duration depending on various factors, including the specific circumstances of the intended parents and the gestational carrier, as well as any legal or medical considerations. Generally, the process can take anywhere from 12 to 18 months or even longer.

The medical tests and evaluations involved in the gestational carrier (surrogate) screening process may vary depending on the specific requirements of the intended parents, the fertility clinic, and local regulations. However, here are some common tests and evaluations that are typically conducted as part of the gestational carrier screening process:

1. General Medical History and Physical Examination: The gestational carrier undergoes a thorough medical history assessment and physical examination. This includes reviewing their overall health, previous pregnancies, and any relevant medical conditions.

2. Psychological Evaluation: A psychological evaluation is conducted to assess the mental and emotional readiness of the gestational carrier to undertake the responsibilities and potential emotional challenges associated with carrying a child for someone else. This evaluation helps ensure the gestational carrier is psychologically prepared for the process.

3. Infectious Disease Screening: The gestational carrier undergoes testing for infectious diseases to ensure that she is free from any transmissible conditions that could affect the intended parents or the baby. Common tests include screening for HIV, hepatitis B and C, syphilis, and other sexually transmitted infections.

4. Hormone and Fertility Evaluation: The gestational carrier’s hormone levels and fertility potential are assessed through blood tests, ultrasound scans, and other diagnostic procedures, uterine health, and overall fertility suitability for the gestational carrier process.

5. Uterine Evaluation: A detailed evaluation of the gestational carrier’s uterus is typically conducted through procedures such as hysteroscopy, saline sonogram (hysterosonogram), or uterine ultrasound. These evaluations help assess the structural integrity of the uterus and ensure it is suitable for implantation and pregnancy.

6. Legal and Financial Evaluation: In addition to medical evaluations, the gestational carrier process often involves legal and financial assessments. This may include reviewing legal contracts, insurance coverage, and financial arrangements between the intended parents and the gestational carrier.

It’s important to note that the specific screening requirements may vary based on individual circumstances, local regulations, and the preferences of the intended parents and fertility clinic involved. It’s advisable to consult with a fertility specialist or reproductive endocrinologist who can provide detailed information about the specific screening process for gestational carriers in your particular situation.

Frequently Asked Questions:

Gestational Surrogates

The main difference between gestational surrogacy and traditional surrogacy lies in the genetic relationship between the surrogate and the child.

Gestational Surrogacy: In gestational surrogacy, the surrogate, also known as the gestational carrier, is not genetically related to the child she carries. In this process, an embryo created using the intended parents’ or donors’ gametes (sperm and egg) is transferred to the gestational carrier’s uterus. The gestational carrier’s role is to carry and nurture the pregnancy until birth. Once the child is born, the intended parents become the legal and genetic parents of the child.

Traditional Surrogacy: In traditional surrogacy, the surrogate is genetically related to the child. In this arrangement, the surrogate uses her own eggs to conceive the child through artificial insemination with the intended father’s sperm or donor sperm. As a result, the surrogate is both the gestational and genetic mother of the child. In traditional surrogacy, legal and ethical complexities can arise because of the genetic relationship between the surrogate and the child. All Love Surrogacy does not do traditional surrogacy arrangements.

It’s important to note that gestational surrogacy is more common and widely practiced today due to the clear distinction between the genetic and gestational roles. It offers a greater level of legal clarity and fewer potential complications compared to traditional surrogacy.

The gestational surrogacy process can vary in duration depending on various factors, including the specific circumstances of the intended parents and the gestational carrier, as well as any legal or medical considerations. Generally, the process can take anywhere from 12 to 18 months or even longer.

The medical tests and evaluations involved in the gestational carrier (surrogate) screening process may vary depending on the specific requirements of the intended parents, the fertility clinic, and local regulations. However, here are some common tests and evaluations that are typically conducted as part of the gestational carrier screening process:

1. General Medical History and Physical Examination: The gestational carrier undergoes a thorough medical history assessment and physical examination. This includes reviewing their overall health, previous pregnancies, and any relevant medical conditions.

2. Psychological Evaluation: A psychological evaluation is conducted to assess the mental and emotional readiness of the gestational carrier to undertake the responsibilities and potential emotional challenges associated with carrying a child for someone else. This evaluation helps ensure the gestational carrier is psychologically prepared for the process.

3. Infectious Disease Screening: The gestational carrier undergoes testing for infectious diseases to ensure that she is free from any transmissible conditions that could affect the intended parents or the baby. Common tests include screening for HIV, hepatitis B and C, syphilis, and other sexually transmitted infections.

4. Hormone and Fertility Evaluation: The gestational carrier’s hormone levels and fertility potential are assessed through blood tests, ultrasound scans, and other diagnostic procedures, uterine health, and overall fertility suitability for the gestational carrier process.

5. Uterine Evaluation: A detailed evaluation of the gestational carrier’s uterus is typically conducted through procedures such as hysteroscopy, saline sonogram (hysterosonogram), or uterine ultrasound. These evaluations help assess the structural integrity of the uterus and ensure it is suitable for implantation and pregnancy.

6. Legal and Financial Evaluation: In addition to medical evaluations, the gestational carrier process often involves legal and financial assessments. This may include reviewing legal contracts, insurance coverage, and financial arrangements between the intended parents and the gestational carrier.

It’s important to note that the specific screening requirements may vary based on individual circumstances, local regulations, and the preferences of the intended parents and fertility clinic involved. It’s advisable to consult with a fertility specialist or reproductive endocrinologist who can provide detailed information about the specific screening process for gestational carriers in your particular situation.

Frequently Asked Questions:

Egg Donors

The egg donation process involves several steps, including screening, ovarian stimulation, egg retrieval, and recovery:

  1. Screening: The first stage in the process is your screening visit where the Fertility doctor will do a full review of medical history, physical exam, Pelvic exam and ultrasound to assess the ovaries along with labs to screen for infectious disease, genetic disorders, and hormone levels.
  2. Ovarian Stimulation: This stage involves taking fertility medications, usually in the form of injections, to stimulate the ovaries to produce multiple eggs. You will take these medications for 10-12 consecutive days. Some women may experience mild discomfort or bloating due to the enlarged ovaries. The injections themselves may cause temporary bruising or irritation at the injection site, but the process is typically manageable and should not cause severe pain.
  3. Egg Retrieval: This is a minor surgical procedure performed under anesthesia, typically twilight sedation or general anesthesia. During the procedure, a thin needle is used to collect the eggs from the ovaries. You will not feel any discomfort during the procedure.
  4. Recovery: After the egg retrieval, you may experience mild discomfort over the next couple of days. You may return to work the following day. Over the counter meds can be used for any discomfort.

After the egg retrieval, you may experience mild to moderate pelvic discomfort or cramping for a few days. This is a normal side effect and should subside within a week. Your doctor may recommend pain relievers or suggest applying a heating pad to help alleviate any discomfort.

It’s important to remember that pain tolerance varies among individuals, and some people may experience more discomfort than others. The medical team will closely monitor you throughout the process and provide guidance on pain management and any potential complications that may arise.

Regarding fertility, women are born with a finite number of eggs, and with each menstrual cycle, a certain number of eggs are naturally lost. During the egg donation process, a larger number of eggs are stimulated to grow and mature in the ovaries than would normally occur in a regular menstrual cycle. However, the procedure does not deplete the overall egg supply, as the eggs selected for retrieval are ones that would have been naturally lost in that particular cycle.